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Posts Tagged ‘interests’

Professional Diversification Online: Using Facebook to Promote Yourself

August 8, 2011 2 comments

facebook eric chaump professional diversification social media network personal brandingOkay, before we really get into this, I want to make one thing very clear.  I’ve heard this phrase a number of times throughout my personal branding endeavors and I want to share it with you.  Facebook will not help you get a job, but rather will help you lose a job.

What does that mean?  When you apply for a job, employers will likely Google your name in search for your Facebook page.  Why?  Because that’s where people post all kinds of stupid stuff (we all do it, so don’t deny it), like inappropriate photos, misspelled status updates, and profile information that’s completely irrelevant.

It’s time for your Facebook to “grow up,” but it isn’t going to be easy.  People are so attached to the way they do Facebook now that they don’t want to change.  Trust me, you’ll thank me later!

Since most of us already have a Facebook account, I’m going to help you change it to be more professional.  Here’s how:

1. Grab Your Vanity URL

To get your vanity URL, go to Account Settings and change your Username.

2. Choose A Professional Profile Picture

Ideally, you want to make your profile picture the same across all your social networks.  Use the one from your LinkedIn or Twitter account.

3. Get Rid Of All The Inappropriate Pictures

This is the biggest reason why people lose jobs on Facebook.  They’ve got pictures of themselves double fisting drinks at the club or peeing in the bathroom at a house party.  Save them on your hard drive and remove them from your Facebook.

4. Fill In Your Basic About Me Section

When you edit your profile information, you’ll see a number of tabs on the left hand side.  Under Basic Information, you’ll see a section for About Me.  Here’s where you want to copy your about me statement from your LinkedIn or About.me page and paste it in.  You can change it up a little if you want it to be more personal and fun, but make sure it remains appropriate.

5. Fill In Your Education and Work Information

Be sure to fill in your education and work, because that’s probably the most professional piece of information on Facebook.

6. Fill In Your Interests

Next, you should find a section for Interests.  Where else do you have a list of interests?  Your LinkedIn profile.  Go there and copy them over to your Facebook.

7. Fill In Your Contact Information

The last piece of information you want to fill in is where people can get a hold of you and where else people can find you.  Make sure you provide your email address, link your Twitter account as an IM Screen Name, and links to your LinkedIn and About.me in the Website section.

8. Continuously Observe “The Mosaic”

As @drbret would say, make sure “The Mosaic” is appropriate.  What is “The Mosiac” you ask?  Click on your actual profile.  Scroll up and down and just browse.  Don’t click on anything.  This is “The Mosaic.”  Do you see anything inappropriate?  If so, you need to fix it.  Make sure your continuously observe “The Mosaic” because it changes over time.

9. Go Mobile

eric chaump mobile facebook app smartphone iphone
Finally, just like any other social network, try getting the Facebook mobile app.  For the iPhone, the app is terrible, but it gets the job done.  It allows you to check your feed, respond to messages, and chat.  Unfortunately, it’s really slow and doesn’t always update properly.

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Professional Diversification Online: Using LinkedIn to Promote Yourself

July 22, 2011 4 comments

linkedin eric chaump profile summary

If you don’t know what LinkedIn is, then you better listen up.  LinkedIn is an all business-related social networking site.  It allows professionals to connect with other professionals and share information.  The unique thing about LinkedIn is that it’s like an online resume, a very versatile online resume.  You fill out your profile, which includes information like your work history, education, honors and awards.  Sounds like a resume, doesn’t it?  What’s unique about LinkedIn is that you can recommend people you’ve worked with and they can recommend you.  Now here’s the most important part of LinkedIn that relates to Professional Diversification: your skills.  LinkedIn recently added a skills section to your profile that allows you to choose what you’re good at and share it with the world.  You get to pick your skill level and how many years you’ve been doing that particular thing.

Now that we all know what LinkedIn is, I’m going to give you a few tips to get your profile up and running:

1. Grab Your Vanity URL.

The first thing you want to do is, obviously, sign up for an account.  Go to http://www.linkedin.com/ and click the “Join Today” link.  The first and most important thing you want to do is grab your vanity URL.  What the heck is a vanity URL, you ask?  A vanity URL is what makes your profile unique to you.  Most social networking sites allow you to pick your own and I advise you choose your own full name, like I’ve done below.  Why is this the most important part of your profile?  Because when people search for your name in Google, they can find you!  DUH!

linkedin eric chaump vanity url

 

2. Fill In Your Resume Information.

The next step is to fill in the bulk of your information.  It’s all that boring resume information, like where have you worked, how long did you work there and where did you go school and when.  Obviously, this is the most essential part of your profile, just as it is your resume.  The nice thing is you can copy it straight from your resume, so you better dust that thing off.

3. Fill In Your Skills.

Now we get to some of the fun stuff.  If you read my post on Interests, Skills and Inexperiences, and actually took my advice, you should have a nice list of skills that you can put in this section.  If you don’t have a list like that, please take a look at that post to help you get started.

4. Fill In Your Profile Summary.

This is something you really don’t get to do on a resume.  It’s where you get to talk about yourself!  Everyone’s favorite thing to do.  Some people are really good at talking about themselves, but me on the other hand, can’t stand it.  I have such a hard time talking about myself, which is one thing I have to get over if I want to be successful.  There are a number of great resources online that teach you how to write great summaries.  If you can’t find any, you could use mine as a template.  Your summary should include who you are and what you want to accomplish, a little something about your education and where you excelled, and where you’re at in your professional career and where you’d like to go.

5. Interests = Potential Careers.

In addition to your hobby interests that you’ve identified from above, I encourage you to list your potential careers as interests on your profile.  If employers are looking for people who want to be stock brokers, they can see that you’re interested in the stock market and investing.  There’s really no other place to put it on your profile, because it’s not necessarily something you studied in school and its not something you’ve done as a profession.

6. Join A Couple Groups.

Groups allow you to get together with other people who are interested in the same things.  You can learn a lot from the people in these groups, so I encourage you to join a few that might interest you.

7. Ask A Question.

LinkedIn has an interesting feature that allows you to ask any questions you might have.  Let’s say you want to know everyone’s opinion on Bank of America’s stock price.  You could ask a question on LinkedIn Answers and have highly qualified people answer your question in minutes.  Make sure you give credit to the person who provides the best answer though.  It’s common courtesy on LinkedIn.

8. Answer A Question.

Once you’ve put your own question out there, it’s time to show people what you’re made of.  Find a topic that you believe to be an expert on and answer someone’s question.  If your answer is the best, you’ll be credited with badges that show you are an expert in certain fields.

9. Ask For A Few Recommendations.

Now that you have your profile all up and running, the last thing to do is to ask for a couple recommendations.  Some people are against asking for recommendations.  They think recommendations should not be asked for.  I disagree with this thought though, because I find people won’t recommend you if you don’t ask for it.  So don’t be afraid.  Find some coworkers, classmates, or bosses that you think would be willing to write nice things about you and send them a request for a recommendation.

10. Go Mobile.

linkedin mobile iphone droid app

If you didn’t know, we’re living in what’s called the “Instant Generation.”  We now live in a world where waiting for information is unacceptable.  That’s why I encourage the use of mobile apps, and LinkedIn has a great one.  When you’re on the go, it gives you the opportunity to respond to messages and check out what your connections are up to.

If you follow these 10 steps, you’ll have a fully functioning LinkedIn profile where people can find you, connect with you, and could help you get a job.  If you have any additional thoughts you’d like to add, feel free to comment below.

Identifying Potential Careers by Leveraging Your Skills and Interests

April 14, 2011 5 comments

careers next exit blue sky clouds sign highwayJob searching can be a stressful process.  Think about how hard it would be to find a job if you didn’t know what you were looking for.  Imagine logging on to a job search website, selecting “Browse All Jobs,” and searching through pages and pages of jobs, of which you might find one or two reasonable offers.  Now, think about how much easier it would be if you knew exactly what kind of job you wanted.

What I’d like to discuss today is leveraging your skills (and interests) from your Professional Portfolio and learning how to turn them into potential money making opportunities.  Identifying and analyzing potential careers is the most important aspect of your Professional Portfolio.  Yes, it’s great that you know what you’re good at or what motivates you, but all that stuff is useless if you don’t know how to use it.  Following the guidelines below, you can put together a list of potential careers that will help you prepare for uncertain times.  It’s as easy as answering the following questions.

1. What?

What is the career you have identified?  What types of job titles are associated with this career?

2. Why?

Why would you want this career?  Why would you be good at this career?

3. Where?

Is this a career you would have to move for?  Or is this something you could do from home?

4. When?

When would you be prepared to start this career?  Do you need additional training or experience before you would be qualified?

5. Who?

Who can you talk to about this career?  Who can help you get into a career like this?

6. How?

If you were to lose your job this week, how would you go about getting into this career?  This is the most important question because it identifies your plan.

Now that we have the guidelines under our belts, I’m going to start blogging three times per week.  Starting this week, I will be adding a new category of posts called Potential Careers.  These posts will provide you with my own personal examples of how to properly use the guidelines above to prepare for uncertain times by engaging in Professional Diversification.

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