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Posts Tagged ‘education’

Professional Diversification Online: Using Facebook to Promote Yourself

August 8, 2011 2 comments

facebook eric chaump professional diversification social media network personal brandingOkay, before we really get into this, I want to make one thing very clear.  I’ve heard this phrase a number of times throughout my personal branding endeavors and I want to share it with you.  Facebook will not help you get a job, but rather will help you lose a job.

What does that mean?  When you apply for a job, employers will likely Google your name in search for your Facebook page.  Why?  Because that’s where people post all kinds of stupid stuff (we all do it, so don’t deny it), like inappropriate photos, misspelled status updates, and profile information that’s completely irrelevant.

It’s time for your Facebook to “grow up,” but it isn’t going to be easy.  People are so attached to the way they do Facebook now that they don’t want to change.  Trust me, you’ll thank me later!

Since most of us already have a Facebook account, I’m going to help you change it to be more professional.  Here’s how:

1. Grab Your Vanity URL

To get your vanity URL, go to Account Settings and change your Username.

2. Choose A Professional Profile Picture

Ideally, you want to make your profile picture the same across all your social networks.  Use the one from your LinkedIn or Twitter account.

3. Get Rid Of All The Inappropriate Pictures

This is the biggest reason why people lose jobs on Facebook.  They’ve got pictures of themselves double fisting drinks at the club or peeing in the bathroom at a house party.  Save them on your hard drive and remove them from your Facebook.

4. Fill In Your Basic About Me Section

When you edit your profile information, you’ll see a number of tabs on the left hand side.  Under Basic Information, you’ll see a section for About Me.  Here’s where you want to copy your about me statement from your LinkedIn or About.me page and paste it in.  You can change it up a little if you want it to be more personal and fun, but make sure it remains appropriate.

5. Fill In Your Education and Work Information

Be sure to fill in your education and work, because that’s probably the most professional piece of information on Facebook.

6. Fill In Your Interests

Next, you should find a section for Interests.  Where else do you have a list of interests?  Your LinkedIn profile.  Go there and copy them over to your Facebook.

7. Fill In Your Contact Information

The last piece of information you want to fill in is where people can get a hold of you and where else people can find you.  Make sure you provide your email address, link your Twitter account as an IM Screen Name, and links to your LinkedIn and About.me in the Website section.

8. Continuously Observe “The Mosaic”

As @drbret would say, make sure “The Mosaic” is appropriate.  What is “The Mosiac” you ask?  Click on your actual profile.  Scroll up and down and just browse.  Don’t click on anything.  This is “The Mosaic.”  Do you see anything inappropriate?  If so, you need to fix it.  Make sure your continuously observe “The Mosaic” because it changes over time.

9. Go Mobile

eric chaump mobile facebook app smartphone iphone
Finally, just like any other social network, try getting the Facebook mobile app.  For the iPhone, the app is terrible, but it gets the job done.  It allows you to check your feed, respond to messages, and chat.  Unfortunately, it’s really slow and doesn’t always update properly.

Go Back to School? You’re Joking Right? 10 Reasons Why Continuing Education is Good for Your Career

March 15, 2011 6 comments

study books desk stress man encyclopedia library school graduate undergraduate MBA PhDWhether you’re currently an undergraduate student or you graduated years ago, I’m sure we can all agree that education is important. When I was nearing completion of my undergraduate degree and everyone around me was celebrating the last few weeks of their educational lives, I was applying for the MBA program. I knew that if I let myself even think for a minute about being done with school, I would never want to go back. I’ve spoken with a number of people who encountered this very dilemma. I can’t tell you how many people I’ve heard say, “I wanted to take a year off and enjoy not having to worry about homework, tests, studying, and actually going to class at night.” I’m sure you can imagine what I’m going to say next. One year, five years, ten years later, those people still never went back to school like they said they would. So for those of you who are nearing completion of your undergraduate degree, take my first piece of advice, DO NOT WAIT!

For those of you who did wait and never went back, take my second piece of advice, GO BACK! To give you some encouragement, here are 10 reasons why you should go back to school:

    1. Fancy Letters

    You can’t tell me it’s not cool to be able to put MBA, MD, JD, or Ph.D. after your name.

    2. Resume Booster

    If you’re looking for a job, having additional education on your resume makes you look more desirable (on paper) and shows ambition and diligence.

    3. Instant Salary Increase

    Sometimes employers pay their employees more simply because they have more education. Companies will pay employees based on experience tiers (i.e. Production Manager III) and will often take related education into account.

    4. You Will Actually Learn Something

    That’s why we go to school isn’t it? To learn. You will actually learn things that will make you more valuable in the workplace.

    5. It Truly Makes You Smarter

    All those lectures, reading assignments, projects, papers, and exams help you think about things in a different light. This intensifies the learning process and makes you smarter in more ways than one by encouraging your brain to think.

    6. Internal Professional Opportunities

    Having a Master’s or Doctorate level degree can open up opportunities within your company that you couldn’t qualify for without. I’ve seen a number of job descriptions that require a Master’s degree and if you don’t have that, they won’t even consider your application.

    7. External Professional Opportunities

    This goes along with #5, but applies to job opportunities outside the company you work for. Maybe you’ve hit a ceiling with your current company and it’s time to start looking elsewhere for opportunities.

    8. Unemployment Gap Filler

    If you’ve been laid off and just can’t seem to get hired, going back to school can fill the gap until you find someone to hire you. Employer’s do not like to see long periods of unemployment on a resume, but if you throw in an MBA during that time, they are more likely to hire you (and pay you more).

    9. Networking

    Universities are an amazing place to meet students, professors, and local business people who share similar interests. Often times, Universities will host networking events where local recruiters come to campus looking for people like you. Take advantage of these opportunities.

    10. Because Your Boss Said So

    Sometimes your employer will ask you to go back to school. Maybe they have big plans for you as an executive level manager, but want you to gain additional knowledge outside of the work environment first. It’s also not uncommon for companies to pay for your education with tuition reimbursement. If you have an opportunity like this, you better jump on it.

As you can tell, I am a strong believer in continuing education. I enjoyed my undergraduate studies, but I’m finding that I’m enjoying my MBA even more. Continuing education isn’t always right for everyone, though. I’ve referenced some related articles below that will help you decide if continuing education is even right for you.

Image Credit

Related Articles:

10 Reasons Adults Should Go Back to School

8 Questions to Consider Before Going Back to School

Where Are You Going? 9 Goal Setting Categories You Need to Address

March 1, 2011 6 comments

everest aim high goalsIf you don’t know where you want to end up in 5, 10, or 25 years, how are you supposed to get there?  Goal setting is one of the most important aspects of one’s life, both personal and professional.  Wikipedia.com defines a goal as “a desired result a person envisions, plans, and commits to achieve.”

I recently decided that goals should be the next topic under our Professional Portfolio’s.  I’ll be honest, I had trouble defining my goals at first, so I searched the Internet to help me define a structure for goal setting.  I came across MindTools.com that had a webpage on Personal Goal Setting.  They identified 9 categories that helped me (and will help you) define my goals:

    1. Career

    To be the Chief Operating Officer of a large corporation or a business administration professor at our local university.

    2. Financial

    To earn enough money throughout my life to be financially comfortable and be able to buy the luxuries in life.

    3. Education

    To earn my MBA, acquire advanced certifications, and later earn a Ph.D. to help achieve my career goals.

    4. Family

    To get married to the woman I love, start a family, respect my parents, and be there for my younger siblings.

    5. Artistic

    To dig deeper into my passion for photography and digital media.

    6. Attitude

    To live life positively, be respectful of others, and attempt to help others achieve their goals.

    7. Physical

    To choose lower sodium food alternatives and exercise regularly to reduce the risk of high blood pressure.

    8. Pleasure

    To take time to experience the joys in life, take vacations, and do the things I love to do.

    9. Public Service

    To be mindful of the environment and preserve this world so future generations can enjoy life the way I have.

Please remember that this list is not all inclusive.  You can add categories to it if you prefer and I encourage you to do so.  You may also think that some of these categories don’t apply to you.  I know I had trouble setting an artistic goal, since I don’t find myself to be very artistic.  I advise you to dig deep and really try to solidify some kind of goal for each of these categories.  Don’t forget, goals can change over time and, in fact, they should.

So what are your goals?  Take some time to think about that and then add them to your Professional Portfolio like I did.

Image Credit

Webpage Credit:

Goal – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Personal Goal Setting – Goal Setting Tools from MindTools.com